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InterVarsity Press Quiet Time Bible Study
A new quiet time study updated everyday from InterVarsity Press. The study includes a portion of scripture, a time of discovery and a time of application. Come back everyday for a new study.

http://ivpress.com/bible/study.php

Joshua
This introduction to the book of Joshua talks about the conquest and the ethical question of war. It also reports on the books title, theological theme, author, and date, the life of Joshua, the historical setting, and outline. Joshua is a story of conquest and fulfillment for the people of God. After many years of slavery in Egypt and 40 years in the desert, the Israelites were finally allowed to enter the land promised to their fathers.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/joshua.php

Judges
This introduction to the book of Judges reports on the title, author, date, themes and theology, background, literary features, and outline. The book of Judges depicts the life of Israel in the promised land from the death of Joshua to the rise of the monarchy.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/judges.php

Deuteronomy
This introduction to the book of Deuteronomy reports on the title, author, date, contents, theological teaching, structure, and outline. The Hebrew name of the book is ‘elleh haddebarim ("These are the words") or, more simply, debarim ("words"). The word "Deuteronomy" (meaning "repetition of the law") arose from a mistranslation in the Septuagint.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/deuteronomy.php

Numbers
This introduction to the book of Numbers reports on the title, author, date, contents, theological teaching, structure, and outline. Numbers presents an account of the 38-year period of Israel’s wandering in the desert following the establishment of the covenant of Sinai.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/numbers.php

Exodus
This introduction to the book of Exodus reports on the title, author, outline, and date of writing. Exodus lays a foundational theology in which God reveals his name, his attributes, his redemption, his law and how he is to be worshiped. It also reports the appointment and work of Moses as the mediator of the Sinaitic covenant, describes the beginnings of the priesthood in Israel, defines the role of the prophet and relates how the ancient covenant relationship between God and his people came under a new administration (the covenant given at Mount Sinai).

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/exodus.php

Leviticus
Leviticus receives its name from the Septuagint (the pre-Christian Greek translation of the OT) and means "relating to the Levites." Its Hebrew title, wayyiqra', is the first word in the Hebrew text of the book and means "And he [i.e., the Lord] called." Read more about the Book of Leviticus from the NIV Study Bible, Introductions.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/leviticus.php

Matthew
This introduction to the book of Matthew reports on the title, author, outline, and date of writing .Matthew’s main purpose is to prove to his Jewish readers that Jesus is their Messiah. He does this primarily by showing how Jesus in his life and ministry fulfilled the OT Scriptures.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/matthew.php

Revelation (Apocalypse)
This introduction to the book of Revelation reports on the author, date, occasion, purpose, literary form, distinctive features, interpretation, and outlink. For an adequate understanding of Revelation, the reader must recognize that it is a distinct kind of literature. Revelation is apocalyptic, a kind of writing that is highly symbolic. Although its visions often seem bizarre to the Western reader, fortunately the book provides a number of clues for its own interpretation.

http://biblica.com/niv/studybible/revelation.php

Jude
This introduction to the book of Jude reports on the author, date, occasion, purpose, and outline. From the NIV Study Bible, Introductions. Although Jude was very eager to write to his readers about salvation, he felt that he must instead warn them about certain immoral men circulating among them who were perverting the grace of God.

http://ibs.org/niv/studybible/jude.php

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“A person finds joy in giving an apt reply— and how good is a timely word!”
- Proverbs 15:23
Today's passage is from the New International Version of the Bible
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